High Rep, High Volume training

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, parth, stuward

Post Reply
VoK
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 127
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 4:31 pm

High Rep, High Volume training

Post by VoK » Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:05 pm

So a couple of months back, I started P90X to get in some variety from my standard weight-lifting routine. As I got through the P90X program, I found myself saying "geez, this guy takes way too many breaks, and some of the exercises are too easy." So I decided to create my own program, based on the same principal: high rep, high volume bodyweight training.

I started with 3 "circuits", each circuit consisted of 4 sets of pushups and 4 sets of pullups. Each set is different than the other (shoulder width, hands close together, hands wide, elevated). I started with 240 total pushups, and 120 pullups. Takes less than 1 hour to do.
6 weeks later, I'm now up to 360 pushups and 180 pullups, and continuing to progress. By September, I'm thinking my goal is 480 pushups, 240 pullups.

For legs, of course, I play soccer 1-2 times a week, plus ultimate frisbee 2-3 times a week. I'm in season right now, so not too much work outside of practice, for fear of overworking the muscles.


What do you all think of this type of training? My plan is to do this for the rest of the summer (2 more months) and then go back to low reps, high sets weight lifting.


User avatar
TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
Posts: 3129
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Va Beach, Va

Post by TimD » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:03 pm

P90X was designed to take untrained individuals, introduce them into some "conditioning type" of training and shed their fat, while building a BIT of muscle, while at the same time, doing some cardio work. As much as I despise infomercials, it actually does a good job with those intentions. The short breaks are what kicks up metabolism and builds up work capacity. I think it's great for THAT purpose, but for strength, and / or size, you're going to need to throw some lower volume, higher intensity work thrown into the mix. Just my .02. Back in the dark ages, when I was in HS (mid 60's), coach had us training that way for a month or so before wrestling season rolled around, and had us continue with a lower volume strength maint program 2 days a week. Note, this followed all summer long doing strength work.
Tim

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jul 29, 2010 3:23 am

Doesn't P90X have some provision for increasing intensity? Harder exercises, or more volume or lower rest? I've heard that it can be pretty tough, but I don't know the details.

I think bodyweight circuits could make good workouts, but I'm not sure that just push-ups and pull-ups make for a balanced plan. How about dips, inverted rows, etc.?

Soccer or Ultimate Frisbee would be great endurance work, but not much for strength. Squats, especially single-leg variations, step-ups, lunges, etc., come to mind for a circuit.

It's a great idea, and could certainly have a place in many people's exercise programs. I just think it could be expanded a bit.

wilburburns
Member
Member
Posts: 625
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2008 12:16 pm
Location: Kentucky, USA
Contact:

Post by wilburburns » Thu Jul 29, 2010 8:47 am

Jungledoc wrote:Doesn't P90X have some provision for increasing intensity? Harder exercises, or more volume or lower rest? I've heard that it can be pretty tough, but I don't know the details.
I have not done P90X, but thought the progression was to add heavier weights (DB's).

I could be confused with Insanity or one of the other recent Infomercial workouts.

Cliff

User avatar
TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
Posts: 3129
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Va Beach, Va

Post by TimD » Thu Jul 29, 2010 8:48 am

Doc, P90X does increase in intensity. I'm not knocking it at all. It used weights, bodyweight, etc. The old Firm tapes were similar. Kind of like a watered down Crossfit with more emphasis on musculature rather than overall fitness. As to bodyweight circuits, the sky's the limit. One legged squats, pushups, pushup between chairs, dips, chins, reverse rows, handstand pushups, grab some DB's or a rock or something and do swings.
Tim


Post Reply