Back pain from twisting movements! Help!

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, parth, stuward

WebAddict
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:51 am

Back pain from twisting movements! Help!

Post by WebAddict » Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:22 am

Hi,

recently I have painfully rediscovered that my back is not only "forward-bending"-intolerant, but also twisting-intolerant.

Every once in a while I like a little bodily labour. A few days ago I decided to chop off branches with an axe instead of using a chainsaw, it was only one to to hours. And yet, the next day, I felt a twingy sensation where my lower back used to be.
Yesterday I tried again and its the same. I get up, feel fine, grab for toothpaste and *ZAPP* pain in the back.


Of course I googled but I dont come up with anything usefull concerning back pain and twisting or rotation. Especially not "back pain an wood chopping" ;)
I even tried to think of a sport that mimics the movements you do while chopping wood - and came up only with golf. The information concerning back pain and golf is very bad though, pretty much "do these two stretches and you'll be cured".


So, does anybody know from experience or can recommend literature to me how to "bulletproof" my back for such activities?!

Thx in advance!


Ryan A
Member
Member
Posts: 667
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:41 pm
Location: Davis, California
Contact:

Post by Ryan A » Wed Aug 25, 2010 3:47 pm

here is just one link, fitting given your request for "bulletproof".

There is also the outside chance that if you hadn't done this activity in a while, you could just be not used to it. Although given the way you describe the pain, it seems like something is not quite right.

Others will probably give their opinions.

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... _that_back

WebAddict
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:51 am

Post by WebAddict » Mon Aug 30, 2010 7:03 am

Thanks, he touches "Anti-Rotation core training" briefly.

Are there any resources more specifically aimed at back pain from rotation?

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6650
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Mon Aug 30, 2010 7:31 am

I expect that the pain will go away in a few days. it's normal to get that when you do a new activity, 1-2 hours of wood chopping would make most people sore if they weren't used to it.

Have a look for Pallof Press articles.

The main exercises you need to do regularily are Deadlifts and Turkish Get-ups.

caangelxox
Member
Member
Posts: 770
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 12:08 pm

Post by caangelxox » Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:01 pm

http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpac ... 3&id=53700 I just found this article about rotation and there are exercises you can do like the deadbug to correct rotation instability along with tests to confirm it.

hope this helps..I have the same problem along with lateral pelvic tilt, which I am working on fixing.


User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Fri Sep 03, 2010 1:30 am

WebAddict wrote:Thanks, he touches "Anti-Rotation core training" briefly.

Are there any resources more specifically aimed at back pain from rotation?
I have seen some good videos on anti-rotation exercises a few weeks ago. I think they were from our own Jason Nunn. Search YouTube using "Jason Nunn" and you'll find a lot of good videos whether or not I'm remembering that this is where I saw the anti-rotation stuff. You'll also find a wedding video of a different Jason Nunn!

WebAddict
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:51 am

Post by WebAddict » Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:07 am

Hi,

I've been offline for a while. I'll read up soon!


The one thing that so far helped me the mos was this little video:
http://nicktumminello.com/2010/01/rotar ... e-missing/

So I guess this is some kind of "screwed up motor pattern" issue..
Upon telling somebody that the keys seems to be rotating the hips to avoid pain they actually something along the lines of "Duh, it really took you your whole life so far to figure this out? EVERYBODY KNOWS!"

So, duh, it's in the hips, stupid...
It's kind of funny, because I knew that the lumbar spine is not designed for large angles of rotation, yet I never actually noticed that I didnt move my hips during wood chopping etc.
So now I'm trying to get the old movement pattern out and the new hip powered movement in ;)

caangelxox
Member
Member
Posts: 770
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 12:08 pm

Post by caangelxox » Mon Sep 13, 2010 9:09 pm

one thing you have to make sure you are doing on any core exercise, especially rotation movements and any lifting you do is engage your abs (navel to spine) and engage those internal obliques as well holding them both in. Otherwise, your lower back will lose stability and therefore twist or/and tweak causing an ache feeling. I am taking pilates this semester at my college (took it once before a few years back, but this semester is even better..teacher is focusing on basics and good posture first and using modifications for those that need it. 1 thing I totally forgot about was the navel into spine and didnt remember how to engage my internal obliques.

I work at ralphs and sometimes I have to push carts outside and it used to bother my back from too much hyperextenstion and not engaging my core and I used to hate doing them...not anymore...no more pain now thanks to pliates class teacher. =) Also you will notice when you engage your abs and obliques, you will be able to lift heavier weights and be stronger on everything you do. A weak core is what causes back injuries. I've always wondered why in deadlifting the bar would want to shift to one side slightly or hyperextending my back at lockout even though I am using my glutes...what was missing was engaging my abs and internal obliques. I felt pressure on my back from deadlifts because of that everytime I did them, not anymore.

make sure you also use proper breathing....exhale out of your mouth, inhail out of your nose.

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:40 pm

caangelxox wrote:make sure you also use proper breathing....exhale out of your mouth, inhail out of your nose.
Angel, what is your reason for this advice? As far as I know it makes no difference whether you inhale or exhale through your nose or mouth. They both communicate with your lungs just the same.

The point you make about "engaging" your abs is a good one. Some people would express it differently, but I think they're saying the same thing. One thing that people argue about in this is whether you should "pull your belly button in" or "push your belly button out." I think that the most important thing is that your abdominal muscles be as tight as you can have them when doing heavy lifting. The abdominal muscles' main job is protecting the spine. I feel it works better for me to take a deep breath (through either my nose or mouth :lol:) and then to "squeeze down" on the breath, but trying to "stretch my belt" with my bell, if that makes any sense at all.

A. moss
Associate Member
Associate Member
Posts: 326
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2010 4:22 pm
Location: Columbus, IN

Post by A. moss » Tue Sep 14, 2010 11:36 am

I think the reason for Angle saying this is that when you take a deep breath through your nose (at least for me), when you breath in, then open you mouth and try to breath in more you can bring in more air. (this isn't good for heavy weights) and (again at least for me) when you have more air in your lungs, and apply pressure to your body, there is shooting pains though your chest/throught from pushing, even after you release the breath. so the amount of air your body can take in through the nose is just the right amount for lifting heavy weights with out any pain. I may be completely off here, but that's my assumption.

User avatar
bam
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 212
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 2:09 pm
Location: China

Post by bam » Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:53 pm

Jungledoc wrote:One thing that people argue about in this is whether you should "pull your belly button in" or "push your belly button out."
I'm a "pull your belly button in" kind-a-guy because it tightens up the (how shall I say this...) sphincter. If you push out I think you run the risk of developing hemorrhoids. Perhaps that's the purpose of the "push down" Doc mentions....

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Tue Sep 14, 2010 9:33 pm

Neither one is going to affect your risk of hemorrhoids!

Jason Nunn
Associate Member
Associate Member
Posts: 349
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 7:35 pm

Post by Jason Nunn » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:34 am

You shouldn't be "sucking in". Bringing your belly button closer to your spine actually decreases lumbar spine stability. You don't want this. Like doc said, big air in and brace.

Thanks for the plug doc! Here's a link to the video you're talking about
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlTz7LFrInI

WebAddict
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:51 am

Post by WebAddict » Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:56 am

What I've come to realized recently is that all those core exercises are great, but if you can't take it outside the gym to the real world they are useless.

And it's like, a lot of people have no problem at all with that. Me though, I seem to be a little disadvantaged in the whole coordination, body awareness kind of thing...


A while ago reading about "muted hip function" in the CrossFit Journal was kind of enlightening.
And now again with the advice from Tumminello.

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Thu Sep 16, 2010 2:45 am

:spam2:


Post Reply