Prilepin's Table: Have I misunderstood this?

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, darshana, stuward

Post Reply
strengthlogs
n00b
n00b
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 11:58 pm

Prilepin's Table: Have I misunderstood this?

Post by strengthlogs » Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:05 pm

Just to give some background information (copied from another resource online):

"During the '60s and '70s Soviet sports scientist A.S.Prilepin collected data from the training logs of more than 1000 World, Olympic, National and European weightlifting champions. Prilepin synthesized his findings in a very simple table; which provides workout guidelines as to how elite weightlifters trained for maximal strength."

Gobs more information can be found by Googling "Prilepin's Table".


One thing that sort of troubles me is that the rep ranges seem quite low for the weights used.

For instance, for the 70-80%, it recommends reps in the 3-6 range, with an optimum of 18 reps per workout (or 12-24 rep range). So, for instance, you could do 3 sets of 6 reps or 6 sets of 3 reps and hit the optimal reps per workout or you could even do 4x5 and be in the range.

Are these rep/ percentage guidelines only applicable to training for bar speed?

The reason I ask is that this all seems to make sense except when you consider that for 70-80% of 1RM you could expect to perform 8-11 reps.

These weights/ rep ranges seem applicable for Dynamic Effort Method training only. The weights are not high enough for Maximal Effort, IMO, and are also not high enough for Repeated Effort training.

"To use the repeated effort method, the athlete must lift the weight with sincere exertions to failure (maximum number of times). With this method, only final lifts in which a maximal number of motor units are recruited are actually useful. If an athlete can lift a barbell 12 times but lifts only 10, the exercise set is worthless"
-- Zatsiorsky, Vladamir M. (1995) Science and Practice of Strength Training.

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6646
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:21 pm

It's designed for weightlifters and they generally do 1-3 reps per set.

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:37 pm

I'm not sure that you can take weightlifting data, and apply it to powerlifting or to general strength training. The Zatsiorsky quote you include is about strength training.

NightFaLL
Member
Member
Posts: 778
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 12:20 am

Post by NightFaLL » Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:58 pm

Olympic lifting is about power more so than raw strength.

You also have to realize that USSR/Soviet Union/Whatever it was at the time was putting as many drugs as possible in their athletes.

They're a major reason people know anything about steroids, because of all the experimenting they and other eastern european countries did.

User avatar
TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
Posts: 3129
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Va Beach, Va

Post by TimD » Wed Jan 05, 2011 5:16 am

Jungledoc wrote:I'm not sure that you can take weightlifting data, and apply it to powerlifting or to general strength training. The Zatsiorsky quote you include is about strength training.
Well, Simmons used that data to come up with his conjugate method, in which he kinda sorta used these set/rep schemes cited for his speed days in PL, and used a more conventional method of maxing out for low reps for the ME days. Seems to work for him and his lifters pretty well.
Tim

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Fri Jan 07, 2011 12:49 am

I can see that it might be useful for speed lifting. It might even apply across the board, but I just don't think that I've seen any evidence of that. Someone should try a parallel study with power lifters.

Post Reply