Belly Fat Increasing.

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levis lover
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Belly Fat Increasing.

Post by levis lover » Fri Feb 11, 2011 9:00 am

I have recently joined gym.
In order to complete the energy requirements of my body i think i am overeating and the fat is accumulating in my belly. I have increased my milk (buffalo milk, usually skimmed) intake three times to what i used to have when i wasn't exercising. Same way my wheat intake has almost tripled. I am on a vegetarian diet by the way and i am kind of lean in physical appearance.
How can i make sure that all my calorie needs be completed without overloading my body with extra fat ?


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Stephen Johnson
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Re: Belly Fat Increasing.

Post by Stephen Johnson » Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:07 am

levis lover wrote:I have recently joined gym.
In order to complete the energy requirements of my body i think i am overeating and the fat is accumulating in my belly. I have increased my milk (buffalo milk, usually skimmed) intake three times to what i used to have when i wasn't exercising. Same way my wheat intake has almost tripled. I am on a vegetarian diet by the way and i am kind of lean in physical appearance.
How can i make sure that all my calorie needs be completed without overloading my body with extra fat ?
Go back to your regular eating habits. Don't eat extra unless you feel hungry.

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Post by Jungledoc » Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:32 am

Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:08 am

@levis lover:

I forgot to ask in my earlier post - what kind of training are you doing in the gym? What are your goals?
Jungledoc wrote:Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.
Hopefully, the wheat that lavis lover has tripled in consumption isn't refined. Even with whole wheat, milk and wheat aren't an optimal way to get protein.

Other than milk fat, levis lover will have a hard time finding fats to eat on a lacto-vegetarian diet. Maybe he could add avocados, coconuts and nuts.

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Post by levis lover » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:22 am

Stephen Johnson wrote:@levis lover:

I forgot to ask in my earlier post - what kind of training are you doing in the gym? What are your goals?
Jungledoc wrote:Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.
Hopefully, the wheat that lavis lover has tripled in consumption isn't refined. Even with whole wheat, milk and wheat aren't an optimal way to get protein.

Other than milk fat, levis lover will have a hard time finding fats to eat on a lacto-vegetarian diet. Maybe he could add avocados, coconuts and nuts.
As i told earlier, i am lean. So want to get some muscles and want to add some weight also. But the purpose for which i have increased my diet isn't being served. Should i decrease wheat and milk consumption and find some other alternatives ?


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Post by stuward » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:37 am

You say you are lean but your are gaining around the middle. I'll take that to mean you have low subcutaneous (under the skin) fat and high viceral (around the organs) fat. That's usually a sign of liver damage and can be fixed by increasing your egg yolk consumption. Even switching to whole fat milk will help. Liver is the best if you can stand it. I'm assuming your high wheat intake is displacing healthier foods from your diet. For carbs, increase your consumption of root vegetables. Coconut oil is a get source of good fat that you need when you don't get enough animal fat. Consider fish like sardines or salmon if you can. If not supplement with fish oil.

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Post by NightFaLL » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:15 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.
You realize that de novo lipogenesis (carbs being stored as fat) is inefficient in humans - right? As in, it doesn't happen often.

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Re: Belly Fat Increasing.

Post by jackthestrat » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:42 pm

levis lover wrote:I have recently joined gym.
In order to complete the energy requirements of my body i think i am overeating and the fat is accumulating in my belly. I have increased my milk (buffalo milk, usually skimmed) intake three times to what i used to have when i wasn't exercising. Same way my wheat intake has almost tripled. I am on a vegetarian diet by the way and i am kind of lean in physical appearance.
How can i make sure that all my calorie needs be completed without overloading my body with extra fat ?
levis lover wrote:As i told earlier, i am lean. So want to get some muscles and want to add some weight also. But the purpose for which i have increased my diet isn't being served. Should i decrease wheat and milk consumption and find some other alternatives ?
To get big and strong, you must put on some body fat.

Accept this as fact and move forward from where you stand.

--EDIT--

Wanted to clarify a bit more.

You are a lean guy, wanting to gain muscle, but you are worried about a bit of weight gain on your midsection. In addition, you don't see how the way you have gone about increasing your food intake has helped your gym goals.

The fact that your midsection is growing means that you are creating growth conditions (caloric surplus). Growth conditions are good - you need them to gain muscle. When you gain muscle, some amount of fat comes along for the ride. You can use certain strategies to minimize the fat gain and maximize the muscle gain (and I'm sure people on here will discuss these strategies at length in this thread :)), but both will happen when you are trying to build muscle.

The reason why you are gaining in your midsection (and not fulfilling your other goal of getting stronger) is that either your exercise program is not appropriate for systemic muscle growth (do you lift really heavy things and put them down again a few times a week?), OR the contents of your diet are out of whack and you are not giving your body enough of the specific things that it needs to grow OR you are just eating way too much of everything, period. Though if it were the third option, you would probably be reaching your strength goals as you got fatter, instead of feeling unsatisfied there.

Given that you are vegetarian, your most likely dietary suspects are inadequate protein intake and excessive carb intake.

What's your exercise program look like?
Last edited by jackthestrat on Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by stuward » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:43 pm

NightFaLL wrote:
Jungledoc wrote:Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.
You realize that de novo lipogenesis (carbs being stored as fat) is inefficient in humans - right? As in, it doesn't happen often.
That's true as long as you are not in an energy surplus or you have metabolic syndrome. Unfortunately, among people that are gaining fat, it happens a lot.

In this case, though, I think the problem is inadequate fat and protein, not too many carbs. That's the other side of the equation, you eat too much of one thing and you don't get enough of what you need.

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Post by NightFaLL » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:44 pm

stuward wrote:
NightFaLL wrote:
Jungledoc wrote:Fat isn't what makes you fat, so don't be afraid of it. Carbohydrates are the bigger culprit.
You realize that de novo lipogenesis (carbs being stored as fat) is inefficient in humans - right? As in, it doesn't happen often.
That's true as long as you are not in an energy surplus or you have metabolic syndrome. Unfortunately, among people that are gaining fat, it happens a lot.

In this case, though, I think the problem is inadequate fat and protein, not too many carbs. That's the other side of the equation, you eat too much of one thing and you don't get enough of what you need.
The point I was trying to make is that it's excess calories - and not carbs - that cause people to get fat.

If you eat an all protein/fat diet above caloric maintenance - you're still going to get fat. I think a lot of people miss that point.

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:46 pm

NightFaLL wrote:You realize that de novo lipogenesis (carbs being stored as fat) is inefficient in humans - right? As in, it doesn't happen often.
This article suggests otherwise:
Insulin Resistance Syndrome, also known as Metabolic Syndrome, greatly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death today. Insulin resistance is characterized by high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar levels, abnormal blood lipid levels, along with abdominal obesity according to a JAMA report on December 1, 2002. Research shows that men with metabolic syndrome were 3 to 4 times more likely to die of coronary heart disease than healthy men. Insulin resistance happens over time as people lose their sensitivity to insulin, which is largely due to the addition of sugar and refined carbohydrates in the typical American diet.

When you have sustained high levels of insulin then you are insulin resistant. At this point your cells are overly filled with fats and sugar and they barely respond to insulin. Symptoms of insulin resistance are persistent high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol readings including high triglycerides and low HDL, type II diabetes, excess weight in the abdominal area, and plague build-up in your coronary arteries and brain. At this point your cells have become insensitive to insulin, similar to becoming insensitive to odors in a room. You notice odors when you first enter since you are sensitive, but eventually you become insensitive to odors until you leave and come back again. Your pancreas puts out insulin, but it will not produce excess insulin forever. When it slows down the production of insulin, the blood sugar level will go up, causing type II diabetes.
The effects of refined carbs is one reason why levis lover shouldn't be consuming so much wheat, even if he is engaged in an exercise program. If the fiber and bran has been removed from the wheat, he might as well be eating candy.

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Post by Wouter » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:54 pm

This might be relevant.

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Post by NightFaLL » Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:00 pm

Someone give me an explanation of what metabolic syndrome is - because everything I've read just basically says it's overweight people or people with diabetes or overweight people with diabetes.

Either way, having metabolic syndrome can't cause efficiencies in fat storage that aren't there. The pathways used to convert glucose to lipids is inefficient from what i've read.

I also wouldn't say the link you posted, Stephen, is a credible source.

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:08 pm

NightFaLL wrote:Either way, having metabolic syndrome can't cause efficiencies in fat storage that aren't there. The pathways used to convert glucose to lipids is inefficient from what i've read.
With the epidemic of obesity in the US over the last 20 or so years - which curiously coincides with a push towards low fat (ie high carb) foods from fatty foods - the pathways you mentioned, sadly, don't appear to be inefficient enough.
Last edited by Stephen Johnson on Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by stuward » Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:11 pm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004546
Metabolic syndrome is associated with many conditions and risk factors. The two most important risk factors are:

Extra weight around the middle of the body (central obesity). The body may be described as "apple-shaped."

Insulin resistance, in which the body cannot use insulin effectively. Insulin is needed to help control the amount of sugar in the body.
This condition is caused or exaserbated by excessive carb consumption. Once you have it, you need to manage your insulin or you risk getting diabetes. Vast numbers of people are becoming pre-diabetic. Obeisity is just one symptom.

This is why Jungle Doc said that carbs are the problem. In healthy people that haven't developed metabolic syndrome, there may appear to be no problem but that doesn't mean that the problem isn't developing.

According to the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, metabolic syndrome is present if you have three or more of the following signs:

Blood pressure equal to or higher than 130/85 mmHg

Fasting blood sugar (glucose) equal to or higher than 100 mg/dL

Large waist circumference (length around the waist):

Men - 40 inches or more

Women - 35 inches or more


Low HDL cholesterol:

Men - under 40 mg/dL

Women - under 50 mg/dL


Triglycerides equal to or higher than 150 mg/dL
Every one of these markers is improved by lowering carbs.


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