Too young to use weights??

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Grifftan
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Post by Grifftan » Wed Mar 09, 2011 9:06 am

Hey, thanks for the response guys.

Some pretty sound advice as usual.
I was thinking of getting him a set of DB's that go from 1k up to 5k also adding a few bodyweight exercises like push ups.

I'm of the opinion that as long as its not going to cause problems then I should take advantage of his wanting to exercise as it can only be a good thing. Especially if it boosts his confidence in the pool, and out of it for that matter.


If only there was something that WOULD help stunt his growth he's :lol: 11 and about 5'6 already!!! Costs me a fortune in clothes and shoes not to mention the amount of food he gets through - wish I could eat like that!!!
:lol:

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Jungledoc
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Post by Jungledoc » Wed Mar 09, 2011 4:42 pm

GTO wrote:I'm not going to let him lift much heavier till he goes through puberty and he can grow some muscle.
And why not?

The ability to "grow muscle" doesn't begin at puberty. His ability to increase muscle mass will increase at puberty, but the principles of progressive overload and adaptation apply to him now. Of course this does not mean that he should make dramatic, rapid increases in weight, but neither should you or I. Just progress the loading systematically as he improves. 2.5-5% increments probably aren't too much for him.

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Post by Jebus » Wed Mar 09, 2011 6:14 pm

If only we could go back in time, I'm sure all of us would have liked to start lifting as a kid.

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Post by robertscott » Wed Mar 09, 2011 6:18 pm

Jebus wrote:If only we could go back in time, I'm sure all of us would have liked to start lifting as a kid.
most definitely, and invested in Microsoft

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GTO
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Post by GTO » Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:32 pm

Doc- Just being cautious and I didn't want to make the work out drudgery and I thought I may have been pushing him too hard, although he liked to keep going up in weight.

He is progressing and I made micro weights in 1/2# increments.He is making linear progress, just going slow and letting his body learn to handle the weight and keep his form correct.

Honestly, before your question, I was worried I was starting to have him lift too heavy

We have been doing 3x5's, pretty much in the starting strength format, so it would be ok to keep going up as long his form is good and he's making progress? ( I guess from your question, I already know the answer).

I really appreciate your advice on this, as you can see from some of the response to the OP there is a lot of misinformation on kids and lifting. I did internet research before I ever let him lift, but like I said I didn't want to push him too hard, but he really wants to keep going up on the weights.

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tyciol
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Post by tyciol » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:35 pm

Movements like straight-arm lat pulldowns seem like they would help in developing one's stroke.
Stefan 93 wrote:I think that it's not good because he will almost monthly increase the weight and then it will be dangerous for his height.
He'll stay short for his whole life and he'll be built like olympic weightlifter and that is not what we all want. Say that to him, that should be enough.
Especially because he's not going to be pro...?
Please supply proof that exercise can negative influence height.

Also keep in mind, even if compressive exercises did do this (say weight squats or whatever) that tractioning exercises like pull ups and dips put the body under no compressive loads (well, the arms in dips, but arms aren't part of height, just your UFC reach). Rather, they help to decompress discs and if they had any effect I believe it would be to make him taller. Traction actually does increase height temporarily for adults by allowing the discs to absorb fluid and increase space between vertebrae.

It does stand to reason that heavy load bearing movements (like squats) would squeeze out the fluid between discs, coupling them with tractioning moves to help them absorb it once more and getting sleep on a spatious bed would counter-act this and I see no reason why there would be problems with height.
Stefan 93 wrote:Best exercise for every sport is that sport itself.
Not necessarily true. He would benefit to be fresh and not extremely fatigued while he is trying to perfect his form in the water. Training while outside of the water with movements that strengthen the muscles he will use will prepare him so that he does not fatigue as rapidly, this way he can be more attentive to maintaining proper form. This is one of the major reasons in martial arts that people do things like push ups or running, so that one doesn't get tuckered out practicing katas and can be more attentive in practicing them properly instead of all shakey and wobbly and faint.
Stefan 93 wrote:He can do many body weight exercises, just look for them on the internet (there are some strange ones that I've never seen).
These are a fine option but do not allow all the options that certain freeweight or machine movements allow. Furthermore, bodyweight movements are just as weight as many other forms of weight training, so they should not be immune to whatever stigma you've labelled them with.
Stefan 93 wrote:If he's not going to become bodybuilder then it is just loosing of his time, let him play soccer or something...
This is wrong. People besides bodybuilders can benefit from strength training movements, especially people who compete in sports. Very bad advice.
Stefan 93 wrote:He must use those 2 lbs until he's maybe 15 and that's not worth the lost time...
Also false, he could handle significant weight on a variety of different movements. 2lbs wouldn't be useful for very much except perhaps prone Y trap raises, posterior delt flies and high rep kickbacks. Even then, I imagine he'd outgrow them.

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