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Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Mon May 02, 2011 11:57 pm
by Paperclip
It just occurred to me that deadlift is a natural partial ROM exercise, in a sense that the agonist muscles aren't permitted to fully lengthened (unless you start from huge deficit). They are fully contracted though during the lift.

Exercises that permits full lengthening of the agonist muscles but restrict full contraction are shoulder raises for example. Pec flies is another.

Just some random thought.

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 4:46 am
by stuward
It's a full ROM of the Glutes, which is the main muscle used in the deadlift. When lifting from a deficit, most people have to bend their knees more, which indicates that their glutes are already stretched to the max.

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 10:33 am
by Paperclip
stuward wrote:It's a full ROM of the Glutes, which is the main muscle used in the deadlift.
True, stu.

BTW, I once read that you should do all resistance exercises to their full ROM because shortening the ROM can teach your muscles to function in a shortened state thus decreasing your mobility. But if I think about it actually a lot of muscle groups only work in a partial ROM in compound exercises. For example in bench press, your triceps work in full ROM while your pecs and anterior deltoids don't. Maybe this isn't what they meant. Anyway it seems a bit silly if I think about it.

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 11:20 am
by Proper Knob
stuward wrote:It's a full ROM of the Glutes, which is the main muscle used in the deadlift.
Wouldn't a weighted hip thrust be more of a full ROM for the glutes, as a deadlift wouldn't take you into hip extension?

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 2:15 pm
by Oscar_Actuary
Stu,
I'm confused. Shoudl I keep my legs stright to the extent I can? surely not, right? Else, it puts a lot more on my lower back. I get down, hips higher than parallel but far from as stright as my hamstrings will let them. (pardon incoherent at work posting)

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 4:01 pm
by stuward
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX8jgCFXYTU" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://library.crossfit.com/free/pdf/51 ... adlift.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Tue May 03, 2011 8:29 pm
by Oscar_Actuary
Yea, that's what I shoot for.
I was picturing that you were talking more of a SLDL - which is what I think of when glutes are stetched. I may have failed anatomy.

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 7:36 am
by KPj
Proper Knob wrote:
stuward wrote:It's a full ROM of the Glutes, which is the main muscle used in the deadlift.
Wouldn't a weighted hip thrust be more of a full ROM for the glutes, as a deadlift wouldn't take you into hip extension?
You should finish a Deadlift in hip extension - think of the cue "hump the bar" at the top. Weighted hip thrusts allow you to go into hip "hyperextension" which, according to EMG data, gives us the most glute activation. Bret Contreras talks about this a lot in his articles - http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... glute_myth" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Weighted hip thrusts are interesting. I've been doing them a lot recently in an attempt to load my hips without involving the hamstrings too much, since I tore my left one a good 4 months ago. When you think about a hip thrust, it's really just a deadlift, lying on your back. The biggest difference is really the bent leg. However, it's basically the same "hip hinge" motion that you should get in a lot of standing hip dominant variations. A deadlift basically is a "hip thrust", in other words, if you look at it purely from the hips....

KPj

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 10:28 am
by pdellorto
I actually coach "stand tall, and squeeze your glutes" at the top of a deadlift. I find if I tell people to get their hips forward they stand tall and then stick their hips out forward and lean back. The "hump the bar" cue makes this a bit worse, IME.

So I just tell them to squeeze their glutes hard and stand up tall. That puts them in a proper finishing position without a backward lean.

As for full ROM, I tend to think that exercises shouldn't be shortened up without a good reason. If you're purposefully shortening a movement (rack pulls, board presses, those half-squats people do, etc.) you need to have a good reason. Generally that's to force people to think about why. It's a great question for clients, too. If they need you to shorten up a deadlift, find out why. If they can't squat all the way to the floor and deadlift that kettlebell without pain or difficulty, you need to figure out why (and/or teach them a different way to pick up heavy stuff off the floor!) If you see them shortening their ROM on a bench press or pullup, find out why. It might be a technique failure, an injury, a muscle that need stretching, a misunderstanding, or whatever.
If you say "full ROM" though they might think you mean "maximum possible range of motion" which is a terrible way to lift anything heavy. :)

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 3:49 pm
by Proper Knob
KPj wrote:You should finish a Deadlift in hip extension
Sorry, confusion on my part. I meant to say wouldn't a hip thrust be a full ROM for the glutes as the exercise will take you into hip hyperextension.

Re: Natural partial ROM exercises

Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 4:17 pm
by ironmaiden708
Some exercises can be harmful if done incorrectly through the full ROM. Two that come to mind is leg press and squats, going through the full ROM may reap better results but at the risk of knee injury I wont do it or recommend it, you only get one set....