Methods of developing strength

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Paperclip
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Methods of developing strength

Post by Paperclip » Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:46 am

That's probably not the most correct title but here's what I want to talk about:

Since your strength in a particular exercise is both neurological and muscular, it would be logical to seek an optimal point of a repetition number where the two meet, or use a variety of rep ranges that cover both like 5/3/1. But what will happen if you exclusively train near the 100% region? Based on the premise, logic dictates that it would be suboptimal, but has anybody tried that before? Bulgarian weightlifters at first seem to train exclusively near their max capacity, but it's not the case if you look at their training log. They ramp up the weight and also employ drop sets.

Regarding the optimal point for strength gain, I'd like to mention that based on this study, a hypertrophy vs rep range curve probably would look like a normal distribution curve, but I imagine that a neurological gain vs rep range curve would probably have a "left side bias" (it favors very low number of reps). So an optimal point for strength gain would probably exist in the low end of rep ranges, something like 4. Wow talk about reinventing the wheel. Actually I just want to make clear what I'm talking about :wink:

Kenny Croxdale
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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:32 am

Paperclip wrote:That's probably not the most correct title but here's what I want to talk about:

Since your strength in a particular exercise is both neurological and muscular, it would be logical to seek an optimal point of a repetition number where the two meet, or use a variety of rep ranges that cover both like 5/3/1.


Paperclip,

5/3/1


This is not "a repetition numnber where the two meet". This repetition range is a strength training program not a hypertrophy program.

Two Different Animals

The repetitions, sets, volume, rest periods, etc that work for one are not going to work for another.

"If you chase two rabbits, you lose them both."

Trying to do two things at the sametimes is ineffective. That why "multi-tasking" is one of the poorest forms of getting a job done.

But what will happen if you exclusively train near the 100% region?[/b] Based on the premise, logic dictates that it would be suboptimal, but has anybody tried that before? Bulgarian weightlifters at first seem to train exclusively near their max capacity, but it's not the case if you look at their training log. They ramp up the weight and also employ drop sets.
Bulgarian Lifters

We covered this in the percentage training post. The Bulgarians based their daily training max off what they could do that day.

As noted in the previous post, your strength varies from day to day.

Myofibrillar Hypertrophy

Strength Training involves myofibrillar hypertrophy. Muscle mass increases with strength training primarily through myofibrillar hypertrohph.

Think of myofibrillar hypertrophy as building something with bricks. Bricks are very strong but take a while to build something.

Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy

Bodybuilding involves pumping the muscle up to make it bigger, not stronger. That is accomplished with low-load volume, lighter weights, short rest periods, etc.

Think of sarcoplasmic hypertrophy as blowing a balloon up. You can blow up a lot of balloons quickly.

Kenny Croxdale

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stuward
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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by stuward » Fri Sep 16, 2011 9:02 am

Myofibrillar Hypertrophy is the type that stays with you and provides function and mobility into your old age. This is "old man" strength.

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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by Paperclip » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:28 am

Kenny, I think you misunderstood my post. I was saying that you need to train the corresponding muscles and nervous system to achieve maximum strength in a particular movement/exercise. What I'm curious about is, what if your training is biased to the neurological side (near max).

BTW about the myofibrillar vs sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, from what I've read you can't focus on one side, so a hypertrophy is both myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic. I need to dig my bookmarks to find the sources.

EDIT:
I think I used the word "neurological" incorrectly. What is the correct word?

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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by stuward » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:34 am

Paperclip wrote:...
BTW about the myofibrillar vs sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, from what I've read you can't focus on one side, so a hypertrophy is both myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic. ...
That's like saying you can't isolate a muscle. Of course everything works together, but you can change the emphasis. It's the same as with the type of hypertrophy. You will get both by training one of them, but you can change the emphasis of the training.

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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by Paperclip » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:38 am

stuward wrote: That's like saying you can't isolate a muscle. Of course everything works together, but you can change the emphasis. It's the same as with the type of hypertrophy. You will get both by training one of them, but you can change the emphasis of the training.
That's what I meant, stu, but I'm not certain and need to find the source.

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Re: Methods of developing strength

Post by Stefan 93 » Fri Sep 16, 2011 6:11 pm

stuward wrote:Myofibrillar Hypertrophy is the type that stays with you and provides function and mobility into your old age. This is "old man" strength.
For how long does it stay exactly? Up to 1 year or more?

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