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GHR

Posted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 10:40 pm
by Danomite
Hey guys,

I've recently had a few problems with my deadlift (I believe it's a weak lower back) and caused a slight pain, not much but enough for me to decide to take a week or two off DLing. I plan to GHR for this time, and also add in as accessory if possible. However my gym does not have any equipment for this aside from regular gymnastic mats, so I have my training partner hold my ankles and do that. I have a problem doing these as it pushes my kneecaps around and is incredibly uncomfortable, and padding the area does not seem to help. Any suggestions to doing this pain free?

Thanks

Re: GHR

Posted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:03 pm
by nygmen
Yeah, pick a different alternate lift.

There is no reason to carry on with something that is painful when you have a whole world of options at your disposal.

I will say, a real GHR set up is very humbling. Very humbling. I apparently pull with my back because I can load up the reverse hyper all day. The GHR pwns me.

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:24 am
by Jungledoc
I use a rolled-up towel placed just in front of my knees, so the knee cap isn't grinding on the floor while I do it. I put a yoga mat down first, the the rolled-up towel. I use a barbell to hold my ankles. I use one of those velcro-on squat pads (one of the two legitimate uses for it, but the way, and the other is not padding the bar during squats) on the bar, and "chock" the plates on the bar with smaller plates.

But yeah, like Erick said, if you can't find a good way to do GHRs, there are other alternatives. Good mornings, for instance.

Erick, my idea of a successful rep on GHR is if I get to the floor without using my arms. I've never done that on a second rep. From then on, if it's something other than free-fall, I keep going.

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:31 am
by Jason Nunn
Jungledoc wrote: But yeah, like Erick said, if you can't find a good way to do GHRs, there are other alternatives. Good mornings, for instance.

Erick, my idea of a successful rep on GHR is if I get to the floor without using my arms. I've never done that on a second rep. From then on, if it's something other than free-fall, I keep going.
Yep. But, I've always considered Goodmornings and RDL's hip dominant exercises and GHR's knee dominant. I like suspended leg curls for knee dominant.

For me, the eccentric portion isn't too bad, it's the concentric that I struggle with. Which is weird to me because my deadlift is fast off the floor and slow to lockout. I'd think my hammies would be stronger...

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 7:08 am
by robertscott
hook your feet under the knee pad of a pull down machine

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 12:47 pm
by DavidMcF
GHR turn me into a little girl :(

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 4:46 pm
by Jungledoc
Jason, I didn't meant to imply that I had the concentric mastered! That's the next step in the progression.

My young sometime-lifting partner refers to GHRs as "face-plants." The concentric is a knee plyo pushup.

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:09 pm
by KenDowns
OK, dumb question. The exrx.net site shows a Glute-ham raise on a Roman chair, what range of motion are you doing just on the floor. Just flat to the floor and back up?

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:36 pm
by nygmen
KenDowns wrote:OK, dumb question. The exrx.net site shows a Glute-ham raise on a Roman chair, what range of motion are you doing just on the floor. Just flat to the floor and back up?
I will bend all the way over like that at times, but I tend to do it more explosive that way, and I'm not doing this to be better at football, ya know what I'm saying?

I do it to torch my glutes and hams, so I stop "flat" or a little below.

BUT, this is a new lift to me, I very well may change my set up 20 times.

Re: GHR

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:35 pm
by Jungledoc
KenDowns wrote:OK, dumb question. The exrx.net site shows a Glute-ham raise on a Roman chair, what range of motion are you doing just on the floor. Just flat to the floor and back up?
I can't find that. A link please?

I only find them illustrated on a GHR bench.

Re: GHR

Posted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 5:50 pm
by Danomite
Thanks for the replies. I tried rolling a towel up in front of my knees and it helped enough that it isn't painful. Hopefully this will help with my DLing.

Re: GHR

Posted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 6:09 pm
by KenDowns
Jungledoc wrote:
KenDowns wrote:OK, dumb question. The exrx.net site shows a Glute-ham raise on a Roman chair, what range of motion are you doing just on the floor. Just flat to the floor and back up?
I can't find that. A link please?

I only find them illustrated on a GHR bench.
This is what I found, where the range of motion goes from head straight up to head straight down. I saw that apparatus referred to as a "roman chair" in Starting Strength.

http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Ham ... Raise.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

But from your description of how you do it it sounds like you are on the floor and can go from head straight up to flat on floor.

Re: GHR

Posted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:24 pm
by nygmen
Mine doesn't have the knee pads at the back end of the thigh pads. So, I have to hold myself up at the top rather than kneel on a pad like dude in the .gif

Re: GHR

Posted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:53 pm
by Jungledoc
He's using a dedicated GHR bench. I don't know if it is considered a type of Roman chair or not. That's why I couldn't find this--I was looking for one with a different apparatus.

Re: GHR

Posted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 11:43 am
by jms
This bloke seems to get the full range of motion on the 'normal' machine without the knee pads though: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ne_pPfxb-_8" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I've been wondering about that, actually. Quite a few people (e.g. Brett Contreras) don't get to 90 degrees at the top in their videos.

No places near me have the machine either, since I am in the back of beyond. Makes me wonder if there's something particular I should look for if I ever get around to buying one... or maybe its just technique.