Adapting Starting Strength

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dudeindisguise2010
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Adapting Starting Strength

Post by dudeindisguise2010 » Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:14 pm

How can I adapt Starting Strength to accommodate my knee injury? I'd like to retain/improve my fitness while my knee heals, but I figure that most of the compound lifts (squats, deadlifts, possibly overhead press) are out of the question. What would be a good substitute for those that would enable me to retain/improve my fitness? I was thinking that I could continue bench pressing, lat pulldowns, cable rows, seated overhead press, and some pull-ups/chin-ups).

Kenny Croxdale
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Re: Adapting Starting Strength

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:46 am

dudeindisguise2010 wrote:How can I adapt Starting Strength to accommodate my knee injury? I'd like to retain/improve my fitness while my knee heals, but I figure that most of the compound lifts (squats, deadlifts, possibly overhead press) are out of the question. What would be a good substitute for those that would enable me to retain/improve my fitness? I was thinking that I could continue bench pressing, lat pulldowns, cable rows, seated overhead press, and some pull-ups/chin-ups).
[b]Knee Injury[/b]

I'd like to know more about what is wrong with you knee. What can and what can't you do? Knowing this may allow me to provide you with a method that will allow you to DIRECTLY work the leg with the knee problem.

With that said, one method that will allow you to INDIRECTDLY work the injured leg.

Unilateral arm strength training improves contralateral peak force and rate of force development.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18443814" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Research shows that when you strength train one limb there is some carry over to the other limb.

Exercise Example

Step Ups on a Box: This is a one leg squat. By performing a Step Up with your good leg, the injured leg will obtain some strength training.

For that matter, preforming a Leg Press with the good leg or any other one leg exercise will work.

Upper Body Training

"I could continue bench pressing, lat pulldowns, cable rows, seated overhead press, and some pull-ups/chin-ups)."

This will work.

Kenny Croxdale
Thanks TimD.

dudeindisguise2010
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Re: Adapting Starting Strength

Post by dudeindisguise2010 » Sat Nov 09, 2013 10:22 pm

Thanks for your response.

From what my doctor told me, I have Osgood Schlatter's, and I'm not supposed to put any unnecessary pressure/do anything that would pull apart the area around my knee. I've pretty much had to rule out anything that involves bending my knees as part of the exercise.

As far as adapting my routine goes, would you just try to do exercises that would hit the same muscle groups as starting strength?

I.e. Workout A Bench Press/Lat Pulldowns/Cable Rows
Workout B Overhead Press/Pull-Ups

I freely admit that I haven't the slightest clue what I'm doing.

Kenny Croxdale
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Re: Adapting Starting Strength

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:14 am

dudeindisguise2010 wrote: Thanks for your response.

From what my doctor told me, I have Osgood Schlatter's, and I'm not supposed to put any unnecessary pressure/do anything that would pull apart the area around my knee. I've pretty much had to rule out anything that involves bending my knees as part of the exercise.
Physical Therapist

The best person to consult with on what you should and should not do is a Physical Therapist. This is their area of expertise, NOT the physicians.

Quad Sets
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iMemFCxYAI" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

You might try this exercise, as a means of strengthening the Quad and knee area.

Unilateral Exercises

As I indicated in the previous post, performing exercises with the good leg has a carry over effect for the bad leg.

So, "One Leg" movements like Step Ups, Leg Press, etc will help.

dudeindisguise2010 wrote: As far as adapting my routine goes, would you just try to do exercises that would hit the same muscle groups as starting strength?

I.e. Workout A Bench Press/Lat Pulldowns/Cable Rows
Workout B Overhead Press/Pull-Ups

I freely admit that I haven't the slightest clue what I'm doing.
"Research is what I am doing, when I don't know what I am doing." Einstein

Einstein made "educated guesses" then took them to the lab to see if they worked.

So, you are on the right track.

My Expertise

My greatest area of expertise is in, "Don't do that!"

In researching what works and doesn't work, I've found more things that don't work than do.

Panning For Gold

All you need is a few gold nuggets to be rich. However, you have to sit on your butt and sift through a lot of dirt and rocks to find the gold.

Learning is similar.

Bending Light by Gravity

Einstein initially calculations were wrong. It took him a few year to figure it out.

Exercises That Hit The Same Muscle Groups

Let me reiterate, a Step Up is a "One Leg Squat". Thus, for the most part it hits the same muscle groups as a traditional squat.

A Step Up also works the stabilizer muscle more that a traditional squat.

Seated Movements

Seated movements will work.

Kenny Croxdale
Thanks TimD.

dudeindisguise2010
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Re: Adapting Starting Strength

Post by dudeindisguise2010 » Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:00 pm

Thank you. I will keep it all in mind.

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