Body Parts Twice A Week vs Once A Week

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, ianjay, stuward

guest

Post by guest » Thu Mar 23, 2006 2:41 pm

I do two or three different exercises for back for a total of 7-10 sets, including warmup sets. I usually do only one "working set" to failure per exercise.

guest

Post by guest » Thu Mar 23, 2006 2:42 pm

I do two or three different exercises for back for a total of 7-10 sets, including warmup sets. I usually do only one "working set" to failure per exercise.

Ryan A
Member
Member
Posts: 667
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:41 pm
Location: Davis, California
Contact:

Post by Ryan A » Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:46 pm

Yes John,
You would add them like that.

I think you have to look more at reps and sets than sets alone.

10x2 is not high volume but 10x10 certainly is.

I would say once you get to 40+ reps you are deifnatley near high volume.

Fewer than 20 is probably low volume.

If the reps are spread over fewer sets then it is generally less volume since hte weights are usually lower with high reps.

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:24 pm

10 sets of 2 reps? Are these all to failure, or are they based on a prescribed percentage of your 1RM. I know powerlifters often perform multiple sets short of failure as part of periodization, however I haven't yet tried this, since I'm still making good gains by pyramiding up to one working set per excercise.

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:46 pm

PS.) I do however vary my rep range from workout to workout. On "light" weeks I aim to reach failure in the 8-12 rep range, while on "heavy" weeks I aim to fail in the 3-5 rep range.

Ryan A
Member
Member
Posts: 667
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:41 pm
Location: Davis, California
Contact:

Post by Ryan A » Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:12 pm

No, not to failure. As has been covered many times on this board, there is no need to train to failure for all sets.

If you are trying to develop high strength with the ability to repeatedly express that strength (ie in any form of sporting activity) then being able to do multiple sets is necessary and this will get the job done.

Getting stronger is about learning the right neural patterns and this comes from doing the lift with the right weight more than a couple times.

There is nothing wrong with training to failure for certain phases but it is too taxingon the CNS to be used endlessly without additional forms of change in the routine.

Even if you pyramid up, it does not need to be to failure. Obviously if you have something working there is no need to change it.

I was mostly trying to make a point about volume.

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:25 pm

I don't go to failure every workout or on every excercise, just most workouts for most excercises. Of course, this only works with plenty of rest and good nutrition, and even then probably not for everyone.

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:50 pm

PS.) I used to train with very heavy volume. For example, in a single workout I might do 16-17 total sets of chest (4 excercises), 12 sets of triceps (3 excercises), 8 sets of calves (2 excercises) and maybe 4 sets of abs. My workouts often ran over 2 hours, sometimes closer to 3. It worked, but I've since found that I can do get better results with a lot fewer sets.

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:55 pm

that last one was me

Locked