deadlifts and variations

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northernbelle
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deadlifts and variations

Post by northernbelle » Mon Apr 10, 2006 6:43 pm

I am fairly new to deadlifts and its variations. I am using lights weights and focusing on form, before increasing the intensity. (I was doing them incorrectly, and was corrected by the in-house trainer)

In the exercise directory, the deadlift, straight-leg DL and stiff-leg DL are listed as erector spinae exercises, with either the quads or hams as stabilizers. Yet I read in posts that they are used for quads or hams. Should I count them as lower back exercises or leg exercises, when making up my routines? Or do they count as both? For example, if I do straight-leg DL for the back, do I then do a hamstring exercise also? Or if I do it for the hamstrings, do I then do a lower back exercise also?

Right now, I am doing a total body routine of about 6 exercises, focusing on compound movements. This is because I am working different hours and my gym attendance is not regular each week. When this job finishes in a few weeks, I will go back to my 5 day routine, alternating cardio and a 2 day split for lifting.

Thanks for the help...

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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Mon Apr 10, 2006 9:21 pm

Northernbelle wrote:For example, if I do straight-leg DL for the back, do I then do a hamstring exercise also? Or if I do it for the hamstrings, do I then do a lower back exercise also?
Straight-leg deadlifts are listed among the exercises for both erectors and hamstrings, so you're killing two birds with one stone. Ah, the beauty of compound movements!

As for regular deadlifts, I share your puzzlement. On this site it claims that they work the quads, glutes and erectors, with the hamstrings as dynamic stabilizers. But on most other sites, deadlifts are viewed as exercising the hamstrings rather than the quads.

Maybe you'll get your answer as to which muscles were worked based on what's sore tomorrow. ;-)

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:41 pm

In a standard deadlifts the quads, hamstrings and glutes move the weight, while the erectors, upper back, traps and grip work isometrically. They're great for developing the erectors and hamstrings, because these are generally the weak links in this exercise. Meanwhile, they're not really a very good choice for developing the quads because the knees only move through a relatively short range of motion.

Many people choose to include standard deadlifts in their back routines simply because they don't want to do deadlifts and squats in the same workout.

Sumo Deadlifts are similar, but they also target the inner thys.

Matt Z

Post by Matt Z » Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:47 pm

With Straight-leg deadlifts you eliminate the involvement of the quads. These are also great for developing the hamstrings and erectors, and give you a much better stretch than standard deadlifts.

northernbelle
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Post by northernbelle » Tue Apr 11, 2006 4:50 pm

Thank you so much for the clarifications. I want to work these lifts into my routine more often.

John

Post by John » Wed Apr 12, 2006 2:40 am

is it too much to do a deadlift, for hams/glutes etc and also a stiff leg dead lift just for the hammies? im almost maxing the lying leg curl already and im wondering what to do after i max it to keep moving up, but i dont wanna put too much strain on my lower back doing too many dead lifts

right now for my legs i do ass to grass squats, lying leg curls, leg press and deadlift

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Post by Ryan A » Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:19 am

GHR if you have them.

Leg Curls arent that important in terms of weight lifted. As long as you are doign them, I am sure you will be fine.

RDL's are better in my opinion because of the stretch they provide while contracting.

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