Lower Back and Abdominal Exercises

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Brinkman
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Lower Back and Abdominal Exercises

Post by Brinkman » Thu Sep 21, 2006 7:49 am

I've just started working out...and I find that when I do sit-ups I feel it more in my lower back than in my abs. Any suggestions?

northernbelle
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Post by northernbelle » Thu Sep 21, 2006 8:37 am

Full sit-ups are not necessarily an ab exercise. Check out the exercise directory section on this web site. It is excellent for choosing exercises.

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Ironman
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Post by Ironman » Thu Sep 21, 2006 10:07 am

It sounds like week internal hip flexors. Try doing leg lifts to strengthen those up.

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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Thu Sep 21, 2006 11:10 am

The Iliopsoas (internal hip flexors) have their origin in the lower back. If you have lower back issues, be very careful when doing hip-flexing exercises like sit-ups. Crunches work the abs more in isolation

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Post by DeadFrog » Thu Sep 21, 2006 12:53 pm

Yeah man, just do incline crunches.

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Post by Otama » Sat Sep 30, 2006 6:36 pm

A normal sit up imposes in excess of 700lb of compression on your lumbar spine or around 3300N. Its interesting that the NIOSH limit for lumbar compression is 3300N! Ideally if you are wanting to train the anterior abs then avoid any lumbar flexion. Performing a curl up will do this. By the way there is no such muscle as a iliopsoas. Psoas and iliacus are two seperate muscles in structure, function and neurally. Because psoas attaches to T12 and every lumbar vertebrae it should not be viewed as a spine stabiliser except perhaps during excessive hip flexor torque. Activation of psoas will place considerable compressive load onto the spine and bending the knees to avoid it, or anchoring the feet doesnt change this.
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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Sat Sep 30, 2006 7:05 pm

Otama wrote: By the way there is no such muscle as a iliopsoas. .
There aren't any such muscles as the quadriceps or hamstrings, either. The provided link clearly distinguishes between the iliacus and the psoas. But they both function as hip flexors.

I had no idea that sit-ups imposed that much pressure on the spine, though. My back hasn't given me many problems (knock on wood!), but I'll keep that little nugget in mind going forward

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Post by Otama » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:32 am

My point about the psoas to put it more clearly is that most people view iliopsoas as a muscle, mainly due to texts and other references failing to keep up with research, whereas most would designate hamstrings or quadriceps as a muscle groups which is why they are usually described in the plural. Yes sit ups are nasty and really shouldnt be prescribed to anybody unless specific performance effects are required via such an exercise.
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