Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for healing?

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Florent
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Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for healing?

Post by Florent » Wed Aug 01, 2012 4:42 am

Louie Simmons mentioned somewhere that he often does light weight for a ton of reps (sometimes hundreds) in order to increase blood circulation in the selected area and improve healing of muscles and tendons (for example, he would do long sessions with indian clubs to rehab/prehab his shoulders). I still haven't found any study backing that.

Does somebody has resources on this potentially very important subject?

robertscott
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by robertscott » Wed Aug 01, 2012 5:06 am

Do you really need a study proving it works before you try it? Studies are all well and good, but if a load of reputable coaches all agree that something works, then I would just take their word for it. A little self-experimentation goes a long way.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by stuward » Wed Aug 01, 2012 5:25 am

Do a search for "active recovery". You can get the same effect as the clubs with a kettlebell or a weight plate. Do circles around your head with the weight. The exercise is sometimes called a "kettlebell halo".
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Florent
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Florent » Wed Aug 01, 2012 5:41 am

Don't you think it would be interesting to find out the optimal rep range/time length/intensity for recovery? I'm all for following what seems to give good results among top athletes, but studies can give additional insight.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by robertscott » Wed Aug 01, 2012 6:34 am

if you are waiting for a peer reviewed, scientific study detailing what guys who bench 500lbs+ are doing to rehab their shoulders, you'll be waiting a long time.

just find out who has achieved the goals you are trying to reach, and copy what they did. No need to complicate things. Overthinking often goes hand-in-hand with undertraining.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Wed Aug 01, 2012 7:21 am

Florent wrote:Louie Simmons mentioned somewhere that he often does light weight for a ton of reps (sometimes hundreds) in order to increase blood circulation in the selected area and improve healing of muscles and tendons (for example, he would do long sessions with indian clubs to rehab/prehab his shoulders). I still haven't found any study backing that.

Does somebody has resources on this potentially very important subject?
Stuward

Here something on "Active Recovery" which Stuward mentioned. http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/magazine ... covery.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Having A Party

Think if training, as having a party at you house.

You can either clean up the dirty plate and glasses immediately afterward or do it the next day.

Passive Recovery

Think of Passive Recovery, doing nothing until the next day. The food is has now dried and it stuck to the plates. The same with the glasses.

That means it is going take take you longer and more work to clean them.

In other word, you workout recovery from doing nothing will take you longer to grow stronger.

Active Recovery

Think of it as IMMEDIATELY cleaning the dished and glasses. It is much easier and faster.

The same occurs when utilziing Active Recovery, you grow stonger faster.

Kenny Croxdale
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Wed Aug 01, 2012 7:59 am

Florent wrote:Don't you think it would be interesting to find out the optimal rep range/time length/intensity for recovery? I'm all for following what seems to give good results among top athletes, but studies can give additional insight.
Light Loads/High Reps/Short Rest Periods

The focus needs to be in "flooding the muscle" with blood, using a load that does not tax you.

1) Light Loads--training loads definitely below 50% of your 1 Repetition Max.

2) Reps--12 reps plus

3) Rest Periods between sets should be around 30 second.

The combination of light load, high reps and short rest periods dramtically increases blood flow.

Garbage Man

One of the blood fuctions is to "take out the garbage". Thus, increasing the blood flow, more garbage is "taken out"...which enhances recovery.

Damming Up Blood Flow

When a muscle contracts during exercise it shut down blood flow to the muscles.

That means when you are performing high repetitions, very little blood flow enters the muscles.

Flooding The Muscles With Blood

When you stop performing the exercise, the dammed up blood then floods the muscles. In doing so, metabolites are "washed out" of the muscle, nutrients are shuttled in to the muscles...an anabolic enviroment is created for faster recovery.

Making It--Active Recovery

Too many individuals push the intensity of an Active Recovery session. When they do that, they over tax the body. It then turn Active Recovery session into an OVERTRAINING session.

DON'T do that.

Keep Light Days LIGHT!

One of the greatest powerlifter of all time was Chip McCain. At 220 lbs, McCain squated 816 lbs and deadlifted 799 lbs.

In going over training with McCain we discussed his "light training" weeks, Active Recovery week.

Rather than using percentages, McCain went by feel. As per McCain, "On light weeks, if the load begins to feel heavy, I STOP."

That because the light active week's ONLY purpose is to speed up recovery.

Driving A Car

Over time, you lean when to apply the brakes and stop at a red light. You assess the distance from the red light and how hard to brake.

That same assessment learning occurs with athletes. They know when to push it and when to back off.

Training Loads/Percentages, Reps, Rest Periods, Sets, etc

These are "Guidlines". Learn them and then learn to be introspective with your training.

Kenny Croxdale
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Oscar_Actuary
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Oscar_Actuary » Wed Aug 01, 2012 3:47 pm

$10 says OP has ulterior motive
Research paper being my first guess.

and thanks Stu for the cool "plate over head idea". I may try that

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Ironman
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Ironman » Thu Aug 02, 2012 3:31 pm

OP is from France, so it's probably legit. I must also congratulate the OP, as you are the first person to post here from an IPv6 address.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Jungledoc » Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:47 am

Ironman wrote:to post here from an IPv6 address.
Is that significant?
Our greatest fear should not be of failure, but of succeeding at things in life that don't really matter.--Francis Chan

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Ironman
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Ironman » Mon Aug 06, 2012 10:18 pm

Yea, nobody uses IPv6. I guess we'll maybe have to use it at some point. We are still nearly all on IPv4, which is the typical 1.1.1.1 format.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Oscar_Actuary » Tue Aug 07, 2012 6:35 pm

that cleared up nothing for me

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Ironman
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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Ironman » Sun Aug 12, 2012 1:03 am

http://ip-lookup.net/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
That is IPv4

IPv6 is a hex code.

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Oscar_Actuary » Sun Aug 12, 2012 11:17 pm

alright. I got this new laptop and somewhere saw IPv4 and IPv6, and it was clearn I was using 4.. but, like much techy stuff, I thought, "that loosk like soemtihng ironman mentioned"
thanks for cool link

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Re: Light exercise and increased blood flow useful for heali

Post by Jungledoc » Sun Sep 16, 2012 8:29 pm

davidmartin414 wrote:1-Water Fastens Weight Loss
2-Frequent Small Portioned Meals For Faster Weight Loss
3-Fruits & Vegetables for Healthier Weight Loss
4-Say NO to Fatty Foods
5-Regular Exercises for Faster Weight Loss
6-Avoid Late Night Meals
7-Listen to Your Body
8-Fiber for Fast Weight Loss
Hello. Welcome.

Please note that your post has very little to do with the topic of the thread.

When you're new, it's best to lurk for a time, then maybe begin by asking a question or two, and then contribute an opinion only when you have something legitimate to offer. Many of your points above (water, frequent meals, No to fatty foods, late night meals) are just plain wrong.
Our greatest fear should not be of failure, but of succeeding at things in life that don't really matter.--Francis Chan

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