Plyometrics & Upper Body Weight Training

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OliverFromPerth
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Plyometrics & Upper Body Weight Training

Post by OliverFromPerth » Tue Dec 12, 2006 8:02 am

Hey guys,

I am a basketballer and my aims are two fold:

I want a stronger upper body so I can look big and push up against my opponent

and

I want strong leg muscles that can get me in the arm.

I have been thinking of using Plyometrics to work out my legs. And follow a normal weight training program for my upper body.

Anyone see any limitations with this? Or any advice?

Thanks

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TimD
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Post by TimD » Tue Dec 12, 2006 9:07 am

I'm probably going to sound like a broken record to the regulars, but over at crossfit.com you will find a good program that combines all of the above. Get registered i, ask for Dub-Dub (William Winger) over in the starting forum. He had the same goals, and is loving the stuff, and has increased his vertical by a few inches.
Tim

Scribbles
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Post by Scribbles » Tue Dec 12, 2006 7:37 pm

Oliver, plyometrics involves the use of stored elastic energy and muscle activity through stimulation of the so-called stretch refelx.

Unfortunately, still relatively little is known about plyometric program variables used in program design. Look for the work of Donald Chu, much of the guidelines in use today are based on his work.

There are some safety considerations to note prior to engaging in plyometric exercise. To reduce the risk of injury, you should understand proper plyometric exercise technique (especially landing mechanics) and you should have a proper base of strength, speed and balance first.

As a guideline, for strength, you should be able to squat 1 and a half times your bodyweight before progressing to plyometrics (lower body). For upper body plyometrics, look to bench press 1 times your bodyweight if you weigh over 220 lbs (or 1 and a half times your body weight if you weigh less).

In terms of volume, if you are just starting out, look for no more than 80 to 100 foot contacts per workout. Two workouts per week should be more than sufficient.

Good-luck and best wishes.

OliverFromPerth
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Post by OliverFromPerth » Tue Dec 12, 2006 8:18 pm

Scribbles

Thanks for the info!

I thought there might be a strength level I should reach before switching to Plyometrics.

Well I guess I better stick with body building.
I weight 187 lbs and I can squat about 132 lbs and bench press about 132 lbs.

Looks like I got alot of work ahead of me!!

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Post by Scribbles » Tue Dec 12, 2006 10:03 pm

Oliver, you're very welcome. Bear in mind these are just generally accepted guidelines and nothing is ever written in stone. If you do want to experiment, do start slowly and err on the side of caution. First and foremost, 'Do No Harm'- pick basic exercises and never sacrifice correct form and proper technique for the sake of speed (or load).

Best wishes.

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