Elbow pain - how to adjust volume and intensity?

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emil3m
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Re: Elbow pain - how to adjust volume and intensity?

Post by emil3m » Tue Apr 30, 2013 5:29 pm

Jungledoc wrote:
emil3m wrote:I have read quite a bit and all arrows point to elbow tendonitis.
Which tendon? Where exactly do you feel the pain? Is it really pain? In your first post you talked about tingling, not about pain.

If the pain is coming from the origin of the tendon (right where it is attached to the bone) it is probably an epicondylitis ("tennis elbow" if on the lateral epicondyle, "golfer's elbow" if in the medial one). There is a ton of information on the web under those names.

Do you do any repetitive motion in other parts of your life, whether work or sports?
This was true only in the mornings. I was sort of "aware" of the elbow it almost felt tender. When and if I put my weight on the elbow (say, to reach over to the bedside table), I felt pain. Also leaning on it at college (on the desk) generated discomfort. It seemed to originate right where the forearm attaches. I was still able to bench and press normally. I do not do anything repetitive outside of working out.

A week ago, I quit all dips cold turkey (even body weight). Elbow is doing better. Perhaps just stay away from heavy direct tricep work? Stick to body weight dips/push-ups or kickbacks. I was adding weight to the belt pretty rapidly brfore this happened.
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Re: Elbow pain - how to adjust volume and intensity?

Post by Jungledoc » Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:56 pm

If it's tendonitis, you should be able to feel the tendon, and feel pain when you press on the tendon. If this is tendonitis, there is specific information available.
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