Good Morning - bar position

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emil3m
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Good Morning - bar position

Post by emil3m » Wed May 08, 2013 4:07 pm

I tried the low position, like my squat, and it rolled back and forth as I descend and ascend. High position felt awkward and it still rolled.

Keeping my head up, by looking straight at the mirror, helped "cradle" the bar and decrease the rolling (not eliminate it). That goes against the mantra of always keeping neck neutral. Is GM an exception? Even on ExRx, the guy does not seem to keep neck neutral.

After the session my back was literally bloody and it's still scuffed up pretty bad. Post-workout scars are cool, but I imagine that would get old pretty fast. Do you wrap the center knurl with a cloth for GMs?


ps
This is about the straight leg variation to work the hamstrings.
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by Jungledoc » Thu May 09, 2013 1:53 am

I use a low-bar position, and the bar doesn't move when I GM. I think that the key is a tight upper back. When the traps and deltoids are tight, they "bunch up" and create a little bench or groove across the upper back for the bar. Find the groove, and pull the bar into it hard.
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Dub
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by Dub » Thu May 09, 2013 5:25 am

I also keep a low bar position while doing good mornings. But I've never had a problem with the bar. My bar position is very tight, my whole upper back is tight, the bar has no space to move. Also the arms and shoulders help to keep it locked in. All this with a neutral spine and neck.
emil3m wrote:ps
This is about the straight leg variation to work the hamstrings.
This I must give my 2 cents. I think that the hip hinge should include a natural knee bend (only a little) while sitting back/leaning forward. This holds true in the GM, but also in the RDL or similar hinge exercises. Knee's shouldn't be locked straigth in my opinion. I've never understood why this would work the hamstrings more anyway. It maybe stretches them more, but then again stretched muscle produces less force.
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by KPj » Thu May 09, 2013 9:00 am

Going straight legged is mostly likely causing some rounding unless you have crazy flexibility in the hammies. Rounding will make the bar want to roll up your back.

Also, pull the bar into your back to secure it better.

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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by emil3m » Thu May 09, 2013 9:36 am

Looks like my upper back was not tight enough. Also, I made the mistake of simply supported the bar with my wrist (like during a squat).


Regarding the bend in the knee. So a slight bend to emphasize hams and a more pronounced bend to work the glutes?
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by Jungledoc » Fri May 10, 2013 12:30 am

emil3m wrote:with my wrist (like during a squat).
On back squat that bar is not supported by the wrists! If you've been doing that, you've been severely limiting your squat! The bar rests on your traps, the hands just pressing it into the back.
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by emil3m » Fri May 10, 2013 4:46 am

Jungledoc wrote:
emil3m wrote:with my wrist (like during a squat).
On back squat that bar is not supported by the wrists! If you've been doing that, you've been severely limiting your squat! The bar rests on your traps, the hands just pressing it into the back.
I suck at explaining. It is probably as you describe. Incidentally, I finally got to body-weight squat last time and couldn't complete 5x5. Would you increase rest time from 90s to 120s or reduce volume to 3x5?
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by Dub » Fri May 10, 2013 5:07 am

emil3m wrote:
Jungledoc wrote:
emil3m wrote:with my wrist (like during a squat).
On back squat that bar is not supported by the wrists! If you've been doing that, you've been severely limiting your squat! The bar rests on your traps, the hands just pressing it into the back.
I suck at explaining. It is probably as you describe. Incidentally, I finally got to body-weight squat last time and couldn't complete 5x5. Would you increase rest time from 90s to 120s or reduce volume to 3x5?
If you are training for strength, increase rest. 90s isn't a good rest for strength training.
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Re: Good Morning - bar position

Post by Jungledoc » Fri May 10, 2013 9:35 am

Rest until you're ready for the next set. If you are training specifically for hypertrophy or endurance then time your rests. Strength, not so much.
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