number of reps per set.

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number of reps per set.

Post by Beginner » Thu Sep 11, 2014 8:18 am

Quick question:
My repetition range is 8-12 and I do 3-4 sets of each exercise. If in one of my sets I manage to complete 12 reps (usually in first set), should I increase the weight next workout? Or I need to do 12 reps in each set?

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by stuward » Thu Sep 11, 2014 11:10 am

Beginner wrote:Quick question:
My repetition range is 8-12 and I do 3-4 sets of each exercise. If in one of my sets I manage to complete 12 reps (usually in first set), should I increase the weight next workout? Or I need to do 12 reps in each set?
You have to set your own criteria. If you're following a program, follow the program. Generally, you increase the weight when you get the maximum reps on all sets. That doesn't mean it's the only way to do it.
Stu Ward
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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by curt » Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:01 am

A small question about reps/sets:
I am training at 8-12 reps in an attempt to build mass. How many sets should I be completing? I have been trying to do 4 sets for compound lifts and then 3 sets of some isolation exercises afterward to target specific muscle groups.
Could someone help me here or give me some tips as to which reps/sets work best for building mass.
Thanks

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by stuward » Mon Sep 22, 2014 6:49 am

There are lots of opinions out there. What seems to make the most difference is mix it up once in a while. You need to vary the stimulus once you have adapted to the current stimulus. What you're doing is good as long as it's working, so if it's working, keep doing it. Once it no longer works, you need to do something else. The main variables are frequency, volume and load and changes in one will effect the others. In the meantime, Brad Shoenfeld has done some research on the subject. Google his name along with Hypertrophy, and you should get lots of good info.
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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by curt » Mon Sep 22, 2014 11:51 pm

Ok. Thanks for the help.

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by excore » Mon Sep 29, 2014 12:00 am

Volume is just tool to incrase intensity. All special techniques like reducing rest or going failure is just tool to incrase intensity. Adding weight or slower tempo is just tool to incrase intensity. Going more often to gym as in freqvency is just tool to yaddayadda.

Weight itself is not important but its good tool to measure progression in strenght and muscular development. Also load % is reminder so you dont work in aerobic level. Right measure can be anywhere around 50-100% load.

If you have medium but progressive intensity in training you keep medium rest.

If you have higher intensity in training you keep longer rest.

Only thing that we can all agree on is that you must progress and weight or reps or anything else are just tools.

Just my cents.


As for topic itself I use notebook for progression and have different "setpoints" I try to brake.

Example:

Day6, 85lbs x8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 6
Day5, 80lbs x10, 10, 10, 10
Day4, 90 lbs x5, 5, 4
Day3, 80lbs x10, 10, 8
Day2, 85lbs x7, 7, 7, 3
Day1, 70 lbs x10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10

So im doing pre-exhausting straight sets which have all same rest period. As you can see progression with 85lbs in volume in weight got huge progression. I used to do 10, 10, 10 then incrase weight but I feel this is more accurate to follow progression and I feel that by getting used to higher load you can more easily handle lower weights.

If I go failure I wont continue with that weight but I might do as extra some extra sets with lower weight which i wont write in my notebook.

Also I always recommend to do pyramid type or straight pre-exhausting sets to avoid injury. I rarely do in less than 5reps but if I do I keep volume quite high and rest period low so its still not too huge load to start with. I once had small injury and it was my last one. Reason for injury was mostly incorrect form but if I had lower weigh it wouldn't happened.

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by Beginner » Mon Jun 22, 2015 2:05 pm

stuward wrote:
Beginner wrote:Quick question:
My repetition range is 8-12 and I do 3-4 sets of each exercise. If in one of my sets I manage to complete 12 reps (usually in first set), should I increase the weight next workout? Or I need to do 12 reps in each set?
You have to set your own criteria. If you're following a program, follow the program. Generally, you increase the weight when you get the maximum reps on all sets. That doesn't mean it's the only way to do it.
Well, I thought there is already defined criteria for that. Here is stated that weight should be determined based on repetions done in the first workout set:
If multiple sets are performed
Straight sets: use the same resistance on all workout sets
Heavy set: after first workout set with recorded resistance, use 5% more weight
Perform one rep just short of failure or compromised form
No need to record heavy set since it can easily be calculated in head
Maintains simplicity and brevity of shorthand method
Weight increases will be dependent upon first workout set
http://exrx.net/WeightTraining/Log.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by tostig » Tue Jan 05, 2016 10:06 am

I have done 12/10 and 8. I have also done 3/3/3. 5/5/5 seems to be the happy medium for me. Not too light and lot too heavy but challenging enough.

Sounds dumb but I don't like doing 12/10/8 just because I don't want to count that high except on my warmup with an empty bar and that's up to 15. When I'm tired and almost worn-out and I still have to do 8, it's a bit discouraging. 3/3/3 is too fast so that's why I like 5/5/5.

After all that, I've lately been doing 7/5/3.

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Re: number of reps per set.

Post by tylerpc73 » Tue Apr 05, 2016 3:22 pm

if I reach the high-end goals (for example 12 reps) in one workout I will definitely increase the weights and most likely go for 10 the next time I do the same exercise. Once I get to 12 reps with that same way, once again I will increase the weight

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