Hypertrophy vs Strength (can you be big AND very strong?)

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trainer Chris
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Post by trainer Chris » Mon Feb 18, 2008 12:32 pm

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Myofibrial hypertrophy is growth in the number and size of the fibers in the muscles that actually provide strength. This type of hypertrophy is what you are looking for. This is what builds strength.



ok so stu i have always understood in all my Biology and Anatomy nad Physiology classes told me that it is 100% impossible to grow more muscle mifers. i agree with everything else you siad in your comment but this is 100% false and i hope everyone else that agreed with his whole comment, read the whole thing first. cause its its true


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stuward
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Post by stuward » Mon Feb 18, 2008 1:12 pm

Do a search on "myofibril proliferation" or "myofibril hyperplasia" or "Myofibrillarization". (Myofibrillarization is Fred Hatfield's term for increasing myofibrils).

The myofbril can split when they reach a certain size. Here's one article that refers to it:
http://anton.free.net.ph/hypertrophy_hyperplasia.pdf

I'm no expert on this but the best article on on functional hypertrophy is this one:
http://www.dieselcrew.com/articles/func ... trophy.pdf

To me it makes no difference if fibers get bigger or increase in number. The effect is the same. However, fibre splitting would sort of explain muscle memory.

Stu

shaf_43
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Muscle Hyperplasia

Post by shaf_43 » Mon Feb 18, 2008 11:04 pm

Muscle Hyperplasia... I found a good article that sums what I was going to post, it also has some other good information and i found it by using stu's suggestion. I usually don't believe what i read on the internet, but the cited sources are the articles I was looking for and and the author sums them up well

http://home.hia.no/~stephens/hypplas.htm

Lee Davis
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Rep range and 1 rep max

Post by Lee Davis » Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:53 pm

I want to keep things basic and simple (for general strength/conditioning).
Doing a single set of @ 12 free weight exercises,would it matter if each set were 8 reps at @ 80% 1 RM or 15 reps at @ 65% 1 RM as long as the targeted 1 rep max was the same (say 250 pounds)? It seems that as long as the targeted 1 rep max is the same you can either lift heavy weight for low reps or moderate weight for moderate reps and the strength outcome should be the same based on the eventual 1 rep max.
Lee

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stuward
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Post by stuward » Wed Feb 20, 2008 2:08 pm

That's not quite true. For an average individual each workout would be equally hard in that the last rep would be difficult. The difference is that lower reps build strength more than higher reps while higher reps build more endurance than lower reps. It would be best if this was explained better under the "Develop a Workout" section but it's not. It is covered to some degree here: http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Periodization.html and here: http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Guidelines.html


Stu


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